Book Review

Review: Once

With each practicum so far, I always find myself behind before I have even started. Mostly, the novels and movies the school discusses are texts I have never heard of before. This practicum, I had to read Once by Morris Gleitzman for my year 8 class. Continue reading “Review: Once”

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Book Review

Review: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

With Voldemort fully revived, the universe of Harry Potter has changed into a grim world. A corrupt government, a torturous teacher and an undefined link between Harry and Voldemort’s mind is definitely not helping to lighten the mood in this book. I feel that in this book, Rowling has yet again found a way to up her game.  Continue reading “Review: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix”

General, Standard 2: Know the content and how to teach it

Generic Conventions

From the start of my Graduate Diploma in Education at the University of Western Australia, I knew that I had a lot of content to catch up on. Teaching English as a first language is completely different to teaching English as a second language as the focus in First Language Acquisition (FLA) is less on form and more on literature than in Second Language Acquisition (SLA). I asked around for books that I should read, and studied my literary terms.  Continue reading “Generic Conventions”

Book Review

Review: Macbeth

Shakespearean literature is the worst nightmare of most secondary school students and I was one of them. Whenever a teacher or professor told me that we would analyse one of Shakespeare’s works, I already said I hated the text without even looking at it. My fear for Shakespearean text did not stop me from getting my English Language and Culture degree of which one of the compulsory units was called Shakespeare’s world. I thought then and there, I was done with Shakespeare, but once you start a Graduate Diploma in Education and major in English, Shakespeare is following everywhere.  Continue reading “Review: Macbeth”

General

Total Physical Response

“I can’t even speak English properly, why would I pass a lesson in Dutch?” is one of the things students say when I tell them I will do a lesson in my first language Dutch. During these lessons, I use the Total Physical Response (TPR) method. This method requires me to give simple commands in Dutch and demonstrate them. Within seconds, I will command students who do not speak a word Dutch to sit down, stand up, change place and turn around in circles. These lessons often result in laughter and students overall are engaged and amazed by their own capability of understanding these commands.  Continue reading “Total Physical Response”